True Blue Bill

True Blue Bill (also known as I’m a Truthful Fellow)

Words and music by Gene Autry, Frank Marvin, and George Rainey


I grew up in the mountains
Out where the snakes have legs
Where the hoot-owls speak in English
And the roosters lay square eggs

I shaved my beard and mustache
The morning I was born
And that night beat up my old man
And drank his rye and corn

Oh, I’m a truthful fellow
They call me True Blue Bill
I never told a falsehood
And I bet I never will

I’ve had some great adventures
I’ve sailed the seven seas
I’ve tamed man-eating monsters
From lions on down to fleas

I’ve swum the wide Pacific
And I walked around the moon
I waded forty feet of snow
The thirty-first of June

I used to be a flyer
And in my aeroplane
I flew across to Paris
And started home again

When I got half way over
The doggone motor balked
So I let the blamed thing set up there
And I got out and walked

One time when I was ship-wrecked
On islands in the sea
By cannibals I was captured
And tied up to a tree

They danced and beat the tom-tom
And they got rather rough
But they said I wouldn’t make good steak
I was too doggone tough

Oh the father of our country
Could never tell a lie
And he was my great uncle
So I ask, why should I?


Transcribed from Romeo 5052, as sung by Gene Autry, recorded February 25, 1931.


I grew up in the mountains
Out where the snakes have legs
Where hoot-owls speak English
And roosters lay square eggs

I shaved my beard and mustache
The mornin’ I was born
And that night I beat up my old man
And drank his rye and corn

Oh, I’m a truthful fellow
Folks call me True Blue Bill
I never told a falsehood
And I bet I never will

I’ve had some great adventures
I’ve sailed the seven seas
I’ve tamed man-eating monsters
From lions down to fleas

I’ve swum the wide Pacific
I’ve walked around the moon
And I’ve waded forty feet of snow
The thirty-first day of June

[Yodeling]

One time when I was ship-wrecked
On islands in the sea
By cannibals I was captured
And tied up to a tree

They danced and beat the tom-tom
And they got rather rough
But they said I would not make good steak
Because I looked too tough

Oh the father of our country
Could never tell a lie
And he was my great uncle
So I ask you why should I?

I used to be a flyer
And in my aeroplane
I flew across to Paris
Then I started home again

When I got half way over
The doggone motor balked
So I let the blamed thing set up there
And I got out and walked

[Yodeling]


Transcribed from Crown 3058, as sung by Frankie Marvin, recorded in January of 1931.